Static Control Monitors and Testers

Welcome back to “A Minute with Miranda.” This week we will be covering how the Ground Master Monitor provides continuous monitoring of the path-to-ground impedance and electromagnetic integrity of eight metal ground connections of process tools in your SMT assembly work area.

The Ground Master Monitor continuously monitors eight metal tools for electromagnetic interference (EMI). EMI can cause equipment lockups and malfunction. The Ground Master Monitor will alarm if EMI is detected. The Ground Master will also alarm if the grounded metal tools have a high-frequency noise that can cause electrical overstress (EOS) damage. The Ground Master Monitor provides both a visual and audible alarm for the monitored ground connections. The Ground Master Monitor meets the Continuous Monitor requirements of ANSI/ESD S20.20 in accordance with ESD TR53.

View the Ground Master Monitor Here

Sensitivity to electrostatic discharge (ESD) is an important concern in PCB assembly manufacturing. Pinpointing where ESD events are occurring on an SMT line can be difficult determine. ESD exposure can take place anywhere in the process, including PCB loading, component handling, soldering, and operator interventions. ESD events generate electromagnetic radiation. The stronger the ESD event, the stronger the electromagnetic radiation. Detecting and measuring the unique waveform generated by an ESD event can help determine where the ESD event is occurring and reduce the time it takes to identify and solve the problem. Watch this video to see how continuous ESD Event Detection monitoring can be setup on an SMT Line to monitor the processes and triangulate where static voltage and ESD events are occurring in the process.

To learn more, visit StaticControl.com

Welcome back to “A Minute with Miranda.” This week we will be covering how the EM Aware Monitor provides continuous monitoring to detect and measure ESD Events in your STM machine.

The SCS EM Aware Monitor is a continuous monitor for three key parameters that allow you to verify your ESD process in an automated insertion machine; ESD events, change in static voltage field, and ionizer balance. The thresholds for all three of these parameters are fully adjustable by the user. The EM Aware Monitor is a miniature radio receiver tuned to detect and measure the unique waveform generated by an ESD event. The EM Aware Monitor meets the Continuous Monitor requirements of ANSI/ESD S20.20 in accordance with ESD TR1.0-01 and ANSI/ESD STM3.1. It meets the recommendations of ESD Handbook ESD TR20.20 which includes “if the products that are being produced are of such value that the knowledge of a continuous, reliable ground is needed, then continuous monitoring should be considered or even required.”

View the full range of SCS EM Aware Monitors here

Welcome back to “A Minute with Miranda.” This week we will be covering how the WS Aware provides continuous monitoring for an operator at an SMT line.

The SCS WS Aware Monitor is a continuous monitor for operators, ESD Worksurfaces and metal tools. It will continuously monitor the path-to-ground integrity and body voltage of two operators. It also monitors the path-to-ground integrity of two metal tools. In addition, it continuously monitors for electromagnetic interference (EMI) on two metal tools, which may cause electrical overstress (EOS) damage. The WS Aware Monitor eliminates the need for periodic testing and record keeping of wrist straps.

Per ESD Handbook ESD TR 20.20 section 5.3.2.4.4 “Typical Test programs recommend that wrist straps that are used daily should be tested daily. However, if the products that are being produced are of such value that knowledge of a continuous, reliable ground is needed, then continuous monitoring should be considered or even required.”

View the full range of SCS WS Aware Monitors here.

Welcome back to “A Minute with Miranda.” This week we will be covering how to test ESD footwear entering an ESD Protected Area (EPA).

Per the ESD Handbook ESD TR20.20, A system test of the footwear in combination with the existing or proposed flooring materials in the plant should be made to ensure that the criteria for the facility are met. When using a footwear checker it is important to make sure the upper and lower resistance limits of the checker match the user’s requirements. When testing the footwear should test within the range of 1 x 106 to 1 x 108 ohms.

Heel, sole and toe grounders should be worn on both feet to ensure effective use. They should be worn by all personnel and visitors within an ESD controlled area. If worn improperly, the heel, sole and toe grounders become ineffective. ESD footwear should be tested daily before use within an ESD Protected Area (EPA).

View the full range of SCS ESD Footwear here.

Welcome back to “A Minute with Miranda.” This week we will be covering how the WS Aware Monitor provides for continuous monitoring of an ESD Workstation setup.

The SCS WS Aware Monitor is a dual workstation continuous monitor for operators, ESD Worksurfaces and metal tools. It will continuously monitor the path-to-ground integrity and body voltage of two operators. It also monitors the path-to-ground integrity for two conductive or dissipative worksurfaces and two metal tools. It also continuously monitors for electromagnetic interference (EMI) on two metal tools which may cause electrical overstress (EOS) damage. The WS Aware Monitor eliminates the need for periodic testing and record keeping of wrist straps.

Per the ESD Handbook ESD TR20.20 section 18.4.2 “Some continuous monitors can monitor worksurface ground connections. A test signal is passed through the worksurface and ground connections. Discontinuity or over limit resistance changes cause the monitor to alarm. Worksurface monitors test the electrical connection between the monitor, the worksurface, and the ground point. However, the monitor will not detect insulative contamination on the worksurface.”

View the full range of SCS WS Aware Monitors here.

Welcome back to “A Minute with Miranda.” This week we will be covering how to use the WS Aware Monitor for continuous monitoring of SCS wrist straps when at an ESD Workstation.

The SCS WS Aware Monitor is a dual workstation continuous monitor for operators, ESD Worksurfaces and metal tools. It will continuously monitor the path-to-ground integrity and body voltage of two operators. The WS Aware Monitor eliminates the need for periodic testing and record keeping of wrist straps. The WS Aware Monitor features operator body voltage detection. It will alarm if the operator generates or comes into contact with voltage that would be dangerous to an ESD susceptible item. Per the ESD Handbook ESD TR20.20 section 5.3.2.4.4 “Typical test programs recommend that wrist straps that are used daily should be tested daily. However, if the products that are being produced are of such value that knowledge of continuous, reliable ground is needed, then continuous monitoring should be considered or even required.”

View the full range of SCS WS Aware Monitors: https://staticcontrol.descoindustries…

Welcome back to “A Minute with Miranda.” This week we will be covering how to properly wear a wrist strap.

ANSI/ESD S20.20 requires seated personnel to be connected to the grounding / equipotential bonding system via a wrist strap. The total resistance of the Wrist Strap System needs to be less than 3.5 x 10^7 ohms. The key to a wrist strap is the intimate contact of the band to the skin and that the coil cord is connected to ground. Wrist straps need to be tested at least daily before handling any ESD sensitive devices.

Operators can choose between elastic and metal wristbands. Elastic wristbands are comfortable to wear and easy to adjust. Metal wristbands generally last longer and are easier to clean. View the full range of SCS Wrist Straps here.

In today’s connected world, we are surrounded by home monitoring networks, fitness trackers and other smart systems. They all use an IoT platform to keep us up to-date with the current temperature in our house or the number of steps we have taken in a day. There are many different applications of IoT: Consumer, Commercial, Industrial, and Infrastructure, but is there a way to use this incredibly smart technology to improve ESD Control? Let’s take a look!

What Is The Internet of Things (IoT)?

The Internet of Things (IoT) is used everywhere today – from medical devices, to vehicles, to homes and more! Simply put, IoT:

  • Connects “things” in the physical world to the internet using sensors.
  • Collects data for these “things” via sensors.
  • Analyses the collected data and provides a deeper insight into the “things”.

Another broad definition provided for IoT is:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the network of physical devices, vehicles, home appliances, and other items embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and connectivity which enables these things to connect and exchange data, creating opportunities for more direct integration of the physical world into computer-based systems, resulting in efficiency improvements, economic benefits, and reduced human exertions.” [Source]

 

Iot History-min.jpgThe history of IoT [Source]

 

What Is The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)?

As mentioned previously, there are many different applications for IoT, but The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) applies specifically to manufacturing and industrial processes.

It has slightly different requirements compared to consumer IoT products but the principle is the same: smart machines (incorporating various sensors) accurately and consistently capture and analyze real-time data allowing companies to pick-up problems as soon as (or even before) they appear.

 

Internet of Things (IoT) and Industry 4.0

IoT helped push the 3rd industrial revolution (machine automation) one step further. “Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) dominate the manufacturing floor, linking real objects with information processing, and virtual objects via the internet. The goal is to converge Operational Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT).” [Source]

The 4th industrial revolution is also referred to as “Industry 4.0”. “At the very core Industry 4.0 includes the (partial) transfer of autonomy and autonomous decisions to cyber-physical systems and machines, leveraging information systems”. [Source]

Industry-4.0-shutterstock_524444866_pk_cut.jpgIndustry 4.0 as fourth industrial revolution [Source]

So, how can companies use the power of IoT and create accessible, real-time feedback on the status of their ESD Control Protected Area (EPA) and ESD control items?

 

Industry 4.0 IoT Platforms in ESD Control

ESD damages can be extremely costly – especially when it comes to latent defects that are not detected until the damaged component is installed in a customer’s system. Conventional ESD control programs incorporate periodic verification checks of ESD control products to detect any issues that could result in ESD events and ESD damage. The problem is that ESD control products (and the EPA as a whole) are not constantly monitored.

Take an ionizer for example: if a company uses ionization to handle process-essential insulators, the ionizers need to be fully reliable at all times. If an ionizer passes one check but is found to be out of balance at the next, the company faces a huge problem: nobody knows WHEN exactly the ionizer failed or if contributed to a charged insulator potentially causing ESD damage.

The Industry 4.0 IoT platform will be a game changer when it comes to creating a reliable and dependable ESD control program. Sensors collecting vital ESD information like field voltage, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI), temperature, humidity etc. in an EPA will help detect potential threats in real-time allowing supervisors to act even before an ESD threat occurs.

 

Advantages of Internet of Things (IoT) in ESD Control

Here is a (by no means exhaustive) list of advantages, IoT can bring to ESD Control:

Collecting Data

The day in an EPA can be busy. Taking the time to capture and record measurements of ionizers, wrist straps, work surfaces, automated processes etc. can be disruptive and is prone to errors. IoT allows data to be collected automatically without any input from users. This helps to increase the accuracy of data and allows operators and supervisors more time focusing on their actual jobs.

Smart-Factory.pngCollecting data is the first step to managing processes – more information

Analyzing Data

Supervisors have all the essential data in one place right in front of them and can make informed decisions; they can provide feedback and give suggestions in case of an ESD emergency. IoT allows to pinpoint areas of concern and prevent ESD events.

24/7 Monitoring

IoT continuously monitors processes and provides a real-time picture of them – no manual checks required. If a potential threat is detected, warnings will show-up immediately. There is no need to worry about potentially damaging sensitive devices because the next scheduled check of ionizers, wrist straps etc. has not been completed yet.

Cutting Costs

The number one reason for adapting an ESD control program is to reduce costs by:

  • Enhancing quality and productivity,
  • Increasing reliability,
  • Improving customer satisfaction,
  • Lowering repair, rework and field service costs and
  • Reducing material, labor and overhead costs.

Reduced Workload and Increased Productivity

IoT pushes all the above even further with the additional benefits of:

  • Reduced workload for operators: Data is collected remotely without any input from users. Operators are not disrupted in their day-to-day activities.
  • Reduced workload for supervisors: Supervisors don’t have to collect and analyze data from personnel testers, field meters, monitors etc. The system does it for them and will highlight any issues.
  • Further increases in productivity and cost reductions: An ESD program can be managed better and with fewer resources.

 

SMT-Line-Layout.jpgStatic Management Program (SMP): the next generation of ESD Process Control – more information

 

Conclusion

IoT will no doubt change ESD control and the way EPAs are monitored. Quantifiable data allows companies to see trends, become more proactive and improve the efficiency of their ESD process control system. IoT will support organizations’ efforts to make more dependable products, improve yields, increase automation and provide a measurable return on investment. Not only will this benefit users and supervisors, but the company as a whole.

SCS Static Management Program (SMP) is the only smart ESD system on the market that continuously monitors your entire ESD process control system throughout all stages of manufacturing. SMP captures data from SCS workstation, equipment and ESD event continuous monitors and provides a real-time picture of critical manufacturing processes.

For more information on how to continuously monitor your ESD control program and/or improve an existing program, request a free ESD/EOS Assessment or SMP demo at your facility by one of our knowledgeable local representatives to evaluate your ESD program and answer any ESD questions!

 

Resources:

Bill McCabe: Quick History of the Internet of Things..
Margaret Rouce: industrial internet of things (IIoT)
Michelle Lam: ESD Control in the World of IoT
Ian Wright: What Is Industry 4.0, Anyway?
Pascal Kriesche: Humans vs. machines – who will manage the factory of the future?
Industry 4.0 Resource: Industry 4.0: the fourth industrial revolution – guide to Industry 4.0

Introduction

Electronic devices and systems can be damaged by exposure to high electric fields as well as by direct electrostatic discharges. A good circuit layout and on-board protection may reduce the risk of damage by such events, but the only safe action at present is to ensure that devices are not exposed to levels of static electricity above the critical threshold.

This can only be achieved by introducing a static control program which usually involves setting up an ESD Protected Area (EPA) in which personnel are correctly grounded and all meet the ESD Standard. However, setting up an EPA does not of itself guarantee a low static environment. Production procedures may change, new materials may be introduced, the performance of older materials may degrade and so on.

Measuring Effectiveness of an ESD Control Program

To ensure the effectiveness of any static control program it is important that regular measurements are carried out:

  1. to determine the sensitivity to ESD of devices being produced or handled.
  2. to confirm that static levels are lower than the critical level, and that new or modified work practices have not introduced high static levels.
  3. to ensure that both new and existing materials in the EPA meet the necessary requirements.

Only after an ‘operational baseline’ has been established by regular auditing will it become possible to identify the origin of unexpected problems arising from the presence of static.

1. Determining the sensitivity of ESD sensitive Devices

It is important to understand the sensitivity of ESD sensitive devices before an action plan can be created. Once you know the sensitivity of the items you are handling, can you work towards ensuring you’re not exceeding those levels.

Part of every ESD control plan is to identify items in your company that are sensitive to ESD. At the same time, you need to recognize the level of their sensitivity. As explained by the ESD Association, how susceptible to ESD a product is depends on the item’s ability to either:

  • dissipate the discharge energy or
  • withstand the levels of current.

2. Measurements to prove the effectiveness of an ESD Control Program

Measuring electrostatic quantities poses special problems because electrostatic systems are generally characterized by high resistances and small amounts of electrical charge. Consequently, conventional electronic instrumentation cannot normally be used.

Measuring Electrical Field

Wherever electrostatic charges accumulate, they can be detected by the presence of an associated electric field. The magnitude of this field is determined by many factors, e. g. the magnitude and distribution of the charge, the geometry and location of grounded surfaces and the medium in which the charge is located.

The current general view of experts is that the main source of ESD risk may occur where ESDS can reach high induced voltage due to external fields from the clothing, and subsequently experience a field induced CDM type discharge.” [CLC TR 61340-5-2 User guide Garments clause 4.7.7.1 Introductory remarks]

718_Use2.jpg
Using the 718 Static Sensor to test static fields

A static field meter is often used for ESD testing of static fields. It indicates surface voltage and polarity on objects and is therefore an effective problem-solving tool used to identify items that are able to be charged.

A field meter can be used to:

  • verify that automated processes (like auto insertion, tape and reel, etc.) are not generating charges above acceptable limits.
  • measure charges generated by causing contact and separation with other materials.
  • demonstrate shielding by measuring a charged object and then covering the charged item with an ESD lab coat or shielding bag. Being shielded the measured charge should be greatly reduced.

 

Measuring ESD Events

ESD events can damage ESD sensitive items and can cause tool lock-ups, erratic behavior and parametric errors. An ESD Event Detector like the EM Eye ESD Event Meter will help detect most ESD events. It detects the magnitude of events and using filters built into the unit, it can provide approximate values for some ESD events for models (CDM, MM, HBM) using proprietary algorithms.

Using the EM Eye ESD Event Meter to detect ESD Events

Solving ESD problems requires data. A tool counting ESD events will help carry out a before-and-after analysis and will prove the effectiveness of implementing ESD control measures.

 

3. Checking Materials in your EPA

When talking about material properties, the measurement you will most frequently come across is “Surface Resistance”. It expresses the ability of a material to conduct electricity and is related to current and voltage. The surface resistance of a material is the ratio of the voltage and current that’s flowing between two pre-defined electrodes.
It is important to remember that the surface resistance of a material is dependent on the electrodes used (shape as well as distance). If your company implements an ESD control program compliant to the ESD Standard ANSI/ESD S20.20, it is therefore vital to carry out surface resistance measurements as described in the Standard itself. For more information on the definition of resistance measurements used in ESD control, check out this post.

A company’s compliance verification plan should include periodic checks of surfaces measuring:

  • Resistance Point-to-Point (Rp-p) and
  • Resistance-to-ground (Rg).

SRMeter2_use.jpg
Measuring Surface Resistance of worksurface matting using the
SRMETER2 Surface Resistance Meter

Surface resistance testers can be used to perform these tests in accordance with ANSI/ESD S20.20 and its test method ANSI/ESD S4.1; if these measurements are within acceptable ranges, the surface and its connections are good. For more information on checking your ESD control products, catch-up with this. It goes into depth as to what products you should be checking in your EPA and how they should be checked.

 

Conclusion

Measurements form an integral part of any ESD control program. Measuring devices help identify the sensitivity of ESD devices that ESD programs are based on, and also are used to verify the effectiveness of ESD control programs set in place. High quality instruments are available commercially for measuring all the parameters necessary for quantifying the extent of a static problem.

We hope the list above has introduced the techniques most commonly used. For more information on how to get your ESD control program off the ground, Request a free ESD/EOS Assessment at your facility by one of our knowledgeable local representatives to evaluate your ESD program and answer any ESD questions!